Voltaire “CANDIDE” or Optimism

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<…> I must confess, when I cast my eye on this globe, or rather globule, I cannot help thinking that God has abandoned it to some malignant being <…>.

The poor in all parts of the world bear an inveterate hatred to the rich, even while they creep and cringe to them; and the rich treat the poor like sheep, whose wool and flesh they barter for money <…>.

Even in those cities which seem to enjoy the blessings of peace, and where the arts flourish, the inhabitants are devoured with envy, care, and inquietudes, which are greater plagues than any experienced in a town besieged. Private chagrins are still more dreadful than public calamities. [P. 64].

“But, pray, Monsieur Martin, were you ever in Paris?”

“Yes, sir, I have been in that city, and it is a place that contains the several species just described; it is a chaos, a confused multitude, where everyone seeks for pleasure without being able to find it; at least, as far as I have observed during my short stay in that city. [P. 67].

“You lack faith,” said Candide.

“It is because,” said Martin, “I have seen the world.” [P. 83].

<…> now, whatever is difficult cannot be long pleasing. [P. 85].

“You are in the right,” said Pangloss; “for when man was put into the garden of Eden, it was with an intent to dress it; and this proves that man was not born to be idle.”

“Work then without disputing,” said Martin; “it is the only way to render life supportable.” <…> let us cultivate our garden.” [P. 103].

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         The Folly of Optimism
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